Rex Lardner does a wonderful job with Babe Ruth and Jack Dempsey here. It's good sports writing and excellent condensed...

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TEN HEROES OF THE TWENTIES

Rex Lardner does a wonderful job with Babe Ruth and Jack Dempsey here. It's good sports writing and excellent condensed biography showing the stature of the men in their prime times and examining the criticism they attracted. This is not true of his coverage of Lindbergh, an authentic hero of the '20's. But, he was a tragic figure of the '30's and a most politically controversial voice prior to WWII. Perhaps nothing would have been better than the bland hints offered on this last matter. Billy Mitchell, Richard E. Byrd, Billy Mitchell and Amelia Earhart are the other aviation entries -- familiar stories briefly handled. There is an interesting essay on Clarence Darrow which points readers toward the autobiography. George Gershwin's career and contributions to American music are outlined, but without the flair the author brought to Ruth and Dempsey. You can quarrel with the inclusion of J. Edgar Hoover and Ernest Hemingway; we are inclined to think that they are both more closely associated with the '30's, both in the public mind and in their own records. Hemingway is given glancing coverage and the entry on Hoover fails to mention the latterday criticisms of the F.B.I.. So, it's about two out of ten and it doesn't add up to the '20's.

Pub Date: May 4, 1966

ISBN: N/A

Page Count: -

Publisher: Putnam

Review Posted Online: N/A

Kirkus Reviews Issue: May 1, 1966