This is undoubtedly the best visual introduction to man's search for his past and some of the beauty that the search has...

READ REVIEW

ART AND ARCHAEOLOGY

This is undoubtedly the best visual introduction to man's search for his past and some of the beauty that the search has recovered. As one expects in Miss Glubok's books, the photographs are superb. One of the necessary, but often overlooked, features of a picture of an archaeological site or one of its artifacts is the problem of conveying the idea of relative size. These photographs all have something (men, trees, etc.) that shows how big, how wide, or how deep. The text is carefully written and, within the confines of a short essay, supply some of the answers to questions that the photographs stimulate. These outline the facts, dates and major finds for expeditions all over the world. The intricacy and patience of the archaeologist's task has never been better suggested than in the double page spread that shows more than two hundred fragments before and after they were reassembled into a small ivory statue over 2,2000 years old. The advances made through such technological aids as the aqua lung and the underground periscope are shown and described. Children using the book will be left with the sense of all that is left to be discovered, problems posed by the past yet to be solved. Handsomely designed and of refresher interest to adults.

Pub Date: May 11, 1966

ISBN: N/A

Page Count: -

Publisher: Harper & Row

Review Posted Online: N/A

Kirkus Reviews Issue: May 1, 1966