Dr. von Karman, a math prodigy, genius and pioneer in aviation and pathfinder in space, died in 1963 at eighty-two. He had...

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THE WIND AND BEYOND

Dr. von Karman, a math prodigy, genius and pioneer in aviation and pathfinder in space, died in 1963 at eighty-two. He had just received the first National Medal of Science from President Kennedy. Von Karman, a Hungarian Jew from Budapest, was early recognized by his father as a potential genius (the boy could multiply any figures instantly and correctly). Not one to be immodest about his discoveries or his place among the immortals of science, von Karman suggested the present biography to Lee Edson though it turns out to be almost completely in his own words. For the past quarter century von Karman has had a tremendous influence on the scientific development of the Air Force, and his power during World War II was particularly evident in his ability to bring the military and scientific circles into agreement. California's Aerojet industry had him as co-founder and longtime guide, and he became the astute organizer of the postwar Advisory Group for Aeronautical Research and Development for NATO, which revived European science during the late forties....The present biography is eminently readable, sometimes puckish, and von Karman himself is rather inspiring in his faith in science.

Pub Date: Aug. 24, 1967

ISBN: N/A

Page Count: -

Publisher: Little, Brown

Review Posted Online: N/A

Kirkus Reviews Issue: Aug. 1, 1967