In 1950, Governor Dewey delivered a series of lectures at Princeton University on the American political system. John A....

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THOMAS E. DEWEY ON THE TWO-PARTY SYSTEM

In 1950, Governor Dewey delivered a series of lectures at Princeton University on the American political system. John A. Wells posits in his introduction that succeeding events and trends render his views even more pertinent today. As a Republican, Dewey spoke then as he might now from the stance of the party out of power. He proclaims the benefits of the two-party system, sees the parties each containing different elements and maintaining coalitions from within, to some extent reflecting one another. He feels they should be judged by performance while in power, not in opposition, and looking back to the Republican tradition, calls for its reassertion. He has hard things to say about all-powerful government as he sees it developing here: it places security before liberty, requires a kind of permanent control and continuity that leads toward a one-party system, can continue only by growing larger and larger, destroys the mainspring of enterprise in society. These criticisms emerge in his attitude toward the role of government in influencing the economy (indirectly, by sound monetary and fiscal and budgetary policies). In foreign affaris, he upholds bipartisanship, fears increasing tendency to isolationism and possibly appeasement, considers our intelligence system inadequate, promotes a United States of Europe. Dewey's position is predictable, his audience less so in view of present party circumstances, and the lapse of his leadership.

Pub Date: May 6, 1966

ISBN: N/A

Page Count: -

Publisher: Doubleday

Review Posted Online: N/A

Kirkus Reviews Issue: May 1, 1966