Borden's main thesis is that cities and industries are obsolete as wartime weapons in the atomic age, and that victory in an...

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THERE WILL BE NO TIME: The Revolution in Strategy

Borden's main thesis is that cities and industries are obsolete as wartime weapons in the atomic age, and that victory in an atomic war would depend on the elimination of opponents' forces and stockpiles. To this end, a prepared navy for dispersal purposes, an extensive and well-trained espionage which will offset the value of surprise- these will make the difference between a strong America or none. For -- if the chaos of today continues- war, atomic war, will come, with America the goal, a war which will originate with a dictator ruled country. Our defense will lie in joint Arctic defenses with Canada, a unified Department of Defense, a citizenry psychologically as well as practically prepared for dispersal, and -- most important of all- an alert scientific front at home and again an extensive espionage system. The air force as we know it will be useless; paratroops will be of greater value. Land armies will be useless. Carriers, submarines and naval bases, these will provide dispersal of extensive stock piles, long range artillery platforms, etc.... He sets this prophecy against a background of the changes in strategy necessitated by the twilight of geopolitics, the relative unimportance of spheres of influence (with technological rivalry the real issue), the new techniques of undeclared war, the survival values of democracy versus dictatorship, the remoteness of the powers from acceptance of the necessity of world government. The race is on between World War III and voluntary world federation, but in the interval a definite policy is necessary. He discusses rockets versus bombers, robots versus humans -- and the probable pattern of atomic warfare waged against the United States..... A book that may precipitate controversy, but that is written in such a sober, undramatic way that it may not catch the public imagination.

Pub Date: Nov. 26, 1946

ISBN: N/A

Page Count: -

Publisher: Macmillan

Review Posted Online: N/A

Kirkus Reviews Issue: Nov. 1, 1946