The Story of a Test Pilot- Major Charles E. Yeager, USAF, is, despite some knowledgeable reference to the technical and...

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ACROSS THE HIGH FRONTIER

The Story of a Test Pilot- Major Charles E. Yeager, USAF, is, despite some knowledgeable reference to the technical and spiritual conditions with which Yeager works, unfortunately gee-whizzy. By overly attempting to hide its light of heroism and ability under a bushel, it creates so many bushels that one cannot see the accomplishments. From the start, the impression is one of continual build up and suspense, and the choking kind of sentiment that erupts continually in sad and poignant little passages about Yeager and his family. How brave they all are, and how deprived, we weep- as we experience the lump in his son's throat as he watches his daddy take off on a test flight. We are wrung with illogical sympathy when Yeager as a young lieutenant is called into the colonel's office for heaven knows what punishment, and is asked if he would like to pilot the Bell X-1. There is too much of this. We are reminded too often that pilots are ""different"" and we are given a very bumpy trip between the haloed eulogies and the more practical aspects of supersonic flying. Here Mr. Lundgren simmers down somewhat to give us good detail on fuel and heat problems, what it's like to fly over Mach 1, and what the implications are for the future. Still, the tone is that all this, especially Yeager, is sacred rather than the outcome of honest, enjoyed human endeavor.

Pub Date: Nov. 2, 1955

ISBN: N/A

Page Count: -

Publisher: Morrow

Review Posted Online: N/A

Kirkus Reviews Issue: Nov. 1, 1955