THE GOLDEN CORE OF RELIGION by Alexander Skutch

THE GOLDEN CORE OF RELIGION

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KIRKUS REVIEW

Addressing the question, what is the value of religion to mankind, the author identifies three elements that can be found in all religions, primitive and advanced, Eastern and Western. These are: appreciation, devoted care, and aspiration. But the heart of religion -- its ""Golden Core"" -- consists in the capacity for devoted caring that it engenders in men. From primitive times this expressed itself in care for the self, for family and tribe, for the dead, and even for the natural world of plants and animals. The ""Great Revolution"" in world religions, which took place in the first millenium, B.C., spiritually transcended the material elements of existence. It expressed itself now in care for the soul, for humanity and for the universe. After describing these developments, the author takes up the problem of religious belief in modern times. The rise of science has displaced many older proofs of beliefs and brought a different view of the nature of things. Yet, he believes, there is a fundamental truth in the essence of religion, especially in its contribution to the needs of man's soul. The author writes, not as a theologian, but as an experienced, widely travelled, and literate botanist and ornithologist. The discussion is thoughtful, and deeply versed in Biblical and other literature, as well as being informed in anthropology and science. If at times, the author's grasp of theological issues appears somewhat misinformed or naive, he compensates for these by the deeply religious tone in which he presents his argument.

Pub Date: Jan. 11th, 1970
Publisher: Holt, Rinehart & Winston