THE SCHOOL FOR WIVES, ROBERT, AND GENEVIEVE by Andre Gide

THE SCHOOL FOR WIVES, ROBERT, AND GENEVIEVE

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KIRKUS REVIEW

One of Gide's lesser, and lesser known works, this is a tripartite and delicate dissection of a marriage, as evidenced through the journals of a man, his wife and their daughter. In The School for Wives, it is Eveline's narrative, from the first elation of her love for Robert, a love which finds no flaw and only self-effacement before the assured superiority of her husband. And then later the recognition of his many weaknesses, the desire to leave him- and concomitantly the Catholic faith. In turn it is Robert's story, in part a justification, in part an expression of his love for his wife, and of the growing religious belief which coincides with Eveline' rejection of hers. And lastly their daughter Genevieve recalls an incident in her youth, in no way connected with the drama played out between her parents.... A not always integrated, fictionally speaking, examination of moral and religious unrest, this was first published in 1929 and is of course a part of the Gide revival.

Pub Date: Jan. 16th, 1949
Publisher: Knopf