THE POLISH PRINCE by Bobby Vinton

THE POLISH PRINCE

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KIRKUS REVIEW

Moja droga, ja cie kocham."" One would have thought that would say it all, but Vinton, crooner of such wretched ballads as ""Roses are Red"" feels there is more to add. The aforegoing is the refrain of his latest hit, which, translated means, ""My darling, I love you,"" in Polish. It rescued the fading singer from oblivion, which beset him in spite of the fact that he is, as he tells it here, the greatest thing since piroshki. His story begins in Canonsburg, Pennsylvania, where four-year-old Bobby, decked out in a Little Lord Fauntleroy suit, sang for the Elks Club despite a case of the hiccups. Such tragedies plagued his entire career, but overcoming one setback after another (a lot of people told him he was no good), he managed to survive the vagaries of a pop career until he landed on top of the Polish heap (where he is pretty much a party of one). They call him the Polish Prince now, since he's brought the polka back to a certain sort of limited prominence, and he's spokesman for an entire immigrant group.

Pub Date: Oct. 18th, 1978
Publisher: Evans