BIOGRAPHY OF A FISH HAWK by Burke Davis

BIOGRAPHY OF A FISH HAWK

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KIRKUS REVIEW

Davis' Chesapeake Bay fish hawk family includes two children and a tended egg that will never hatch--a result of poisons from ""far away,"" ingested by the mother in her diet of fish. Their nest is a 500-pound ""tower of rubbish,"" inhabited and improved upon by twenty years of changing tenants, and they share it with smaller birds and deer mice. Davis has one of the young ones killed by a raccoon before the parents chase off the nest raider, and he follows the other as he grows, learns to fly and fish, joins others in the fall flight to Brazil where some are shot by hunters (only three or four of every ten fledglings survive to adulthood), and finds a female with whom he mates during breaks in their nest-building--a typical structure composed of branches, twigs, banana skin, a dead muskrat, part of a life preserver, and other hardy building materials. A readable, well-ordered addition to this life cycle series.

Pub Date: Sept. 16th, 1977
Publisher: Putnam