THE FIFTH AND FINAL SUN: An Ancient Aztec Myth of the Sun's Origin by C. Shana -- Adapt. & Illus. Greger

THE FIFTH AND FINAL SUN: An Ancient Aztec Myth of the Sun's Origin

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KIRKUS REVIEW

An ancient Aztec creation myth, explaining the origin of the sun, retold and illustrated for a grade-school audience. Divided into five chapters that correspond to each of the suns, the book recounts how, in the beginning, there was no sun and the White Evening Star God shone all alone in the sky. She was replaced by the God of the Night, who was replaced by the God of the Wind. The saga continues until we reach the fifth and final sun, the one that still shines today. Greger's retelling of these stories is notable for directness and clarity. Her illustrations -- vivid, intricate, and haunting -- resemble the watercolors of William Blake and have something of their otherworldly preoccupation. Some are less understandable than others, but mostly, the pictures glow with a mystical light and do much (particularly the bold and dramatic two-pages spreads) to bring the text to life. An author's note explains the origin of the stories, providing useful context. All in all, an unusual book that should do much to illuminate the legends of an important ancient culture.

Pub Date: Aug. 1st, 1994
Page count: 32pp
Publisher: Houghton Mifflin