Food & Cooking Book Reviews

FOOD & COOKING
Released: Feb. 28, 2012

"Sure to become a standard go-to for elementary teachers and gardeners alike, this is bound to spark some backyard explorations. (Informational picture book. 4-9)"
Zoehfeld's latest is a wonderfully informative and enjoyable journey through one family's backyard garden, from spring planting to fall harvest. Read full book review >
THE PRINCESS OF BORSCHT by Leda Schubert
FAMILY AND GROWING UP
Released: Nov. 22, 2011

"Appetizing and heartwarming. (Picture book. 3-9)"
Too many cooks can make wonderful borscht. Read full book review >

MOUSENET by Prudence Breitrose
ANIMALS
Released: Nov. 8, 2011

"Genuine goodwill, humor and impressive believability will have readers longing for mice as friends—not to mention political allies. (Animal fantasy. 8-12)"
What if computer mice meant something more exciting than tech accessories—something that could change the world? Read full book review >
ONE WORLD KIDS COOKBOOK by Sean Mendez
FAMILY AND GROWING UP
Released: Nov. 1, 2011

"A deliciously engaging fusion of cookbook and cultural lesson. (Nonfiction. 8 & up)"
International recipes for families interested in cooking a variety of world cuisines together. Read full book review >
FICTION
Released: Oct. 31, 2011

"The dual message of nutrition and diversity will probably find its place in today's curriculum and can certainly augment units on food, language and culture. (Picture book. 5-8)"
On the first day of her new school, Adelita learns that vegetables can have similarities and differences, as can new friends. Read full book review >

SIZZLE by Lee McClain
FAMILY AND GROWING UP
Released: Oct. 1, 2011

"A charming heroine and a happy, if slightly unrealistic, ending make this stand out above the usual fare. (Fiction. 12 & up)"
An unexpected family illness forces a 14-year-old Latina foodie to leave her Arizona home for a large Pennsylvania household. Read full book review >
THE HUNGRY GHOST OF RUE ORLEANS by Mary Quattlebaum
FICTION
Released: Sept. 27, 2011

"Pair with Cambria Evans' Bone Soup (2008) or Kazuno Kahora's Ghosts in the House! (2008) for some fantastic, not-so-scary ghostly fun. (author's note) (Picture book. 4-8)"
An enjoyable New Orleans tale featuring a most un-frightening ghost. Read full book review >
THE BOY WHO WANTED TO COOK by Gloria Whelan
FAMILY AND GROWING UP
Released: Sept. 9, 2011

"Needs more spice. (glossary) (Picture book. 6-9)"
A riveting tale of French life? Read full book review >
STAY WITH ME by Paul Griffin
ANIMALS
Released: Sept. 8, 2011

"An outstanding love story peopled by a wealth of memorable characters. (Fiction. 14 & up)"
Their relationship is doomed from the start. Read full book review >
TALIA AND THE RUDE VEGETABLES by Linda Elovitz Marshall
FICTION
Released: Sept. 1, 2011

"A charming fall story loosely structured by Judaic concepts. (recipe) (Picture book. 4-6)"
A little girl's misunderstanding, the harvesting of some root vegetables and a recipe for stew merge for an amusing Jewish New Year story. Read full book review >
BAKE SALE by Sara Varon
by Sara Varon, illustrated by Sara Varon
FICTION
Released: Aug. 30, 2011

"An offbeat story about the sacrifices made for friends, about the very everydayness of such acts and the pitfalls and pleasures in their wake. (Picture book. 6 & up)"
Varon returns with another strange and charming graphic work that touches on the theme of her terrific Robot Dreams (2007), namely: how fine friendship can be, and how surely it leads you down a twisty road of joys and melancholy. Read full book review >
BROWNIE & PEARL GRAB A BITE by Cynthia Rylant
ANIMALS
Released: Aug. 23, 2011

"A satisfying addition to a consistently strong series. Bon appetit. (Picture book/early reader 3-6)"
In this latest installment of Rylant and Biggs' picture-book series, Brownie and Pearl do lunch and invite readers to join in the fun. Read full book review >
Kirkus Interview
Laini Taylor
March 27, 2017

In bestselling YA writer Laini Taylor’s new fantasy novel, Strange the Dreamer, the dream chooses the dreamer, not the other way around—and Lazlo Strange, war orphan and junior librarian, has always feared that his dream chose poorly. Since he was five years old he's been obsessed with the mythic lost city of Weep, but it would take someone bolder than he to cross half the world in search of it. Then a stunning opportunity presents itself, in the person of a hero called the Godslayer and a band of legendary warriors, and he has to seize his chance to lose his dream forever. What happened in Weep two hundred years ago to cut it off from the rest of the world? What exactly did the Godslayer slay that went by the name of god? And what is the mysterious problem he now seeks help in solving? “Lovers of intricate worldbuilding and feverish romance will find this enthralling,” our critic writes. View video >