LUNCH WITH A STRANGER by David E. Walker

LUNCH WITH A STRANGER

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KIRKUS REVIEW

A career in Secret Service (British) began with ""lunch with a stranger"" in London in 1938 and lasted seven years. David Walker (not to be confused with the creator of Wee Geordie) had no experience, other than that of a journalist, to build on when he was sent first to Switzerland in his new role. This follows the twists and turns of a shapeless pattern, geographically speaking, that took him in active intelligence work from Switzerland to the Balkans, back and forth through those troubled countries- Rumania, Poland, Hungary, Greece, working with all kinds of agents, getting information out to London through various channels, risking discovery again and again- and always using as a front his roving correspondent assignment for the Mirror. With the collapse of that part of the world, he was recalled- trained for special services-assigned to what he terms the second team and sent to Lisbon, there to help manufacture ""sibs""- the psychological warfare of rumors, gossip, etc. designed to break morale. This lasted until the second front was under way, and contributed to the amazingly successful deception which located Germany forces in strength in the wrong place. At the Front when the Ardennes offensive turned tables briefly, he found himself on the receiving end of false rumor. And with the war's end, he was at last able to be himself again. Good true spying story, but almost completely shorn of the intimate closeup of actual experience that might have given it added glamor.

Publisher: Norton