PRAISE THE HUMAN SEASON by Don Robertson

PRAISE THE HUMAN SEASON

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KIRKUS REVIEW

It's a long putt-putt trip into the past of Howard Amberson and his wife Anne -- both elderly and ill of a heart condition and cancer respectively -- as they set out on an unplotted journey from their Ohio home. Howard's intent had been to somehow find the meaning and importance of it all, and their lives which are about to end. Via flashbacks, key relationships in Howard's life and their marriage are examined: one favorite son, loved perhaps too much and another who resented this, now both dead; a daughter and grandchildren; a sister who ""courted death""; a sister-in-law with whom Howard had spent one compassionate night of love; a daughter-in-law with whom they were never reconciled; etc. Along the way the pair meet a series of cheerful, jaunty beings who have somehow chipped away at adversity and it all adds up to love, love, love, before the foregone sad conclusion. A very sentimental journey studded with some heavy-handed quipping between husband and wife which runs to ""Touche"" and ""Not on your tintype."" Then there are Howard's erotic memories -- C cup spectaculars of an embarrassing nature. A brave, somewhat tear-stained try but certainly not The Greatest Thing Since Sliced Bread.

Pub Date: June 17th, 1974
Publisher: Arthur Fields