DAUGHTER OF LIBERTY by Edna Boutwell

DAUGHTER OF LIBERTY

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KIRKUS REVIEW

Amy Sumner comes to live with her aunt near Boston, but she would prefer to join her father and brothers fighting with the Green Mountain Boys, insisting that she will never ""be a little lady."" Aunt Polly gives her a doll Benjamin Franklin sent to his sister, and Amy learns to make clothes for the doll, her only young companion. She also learns to embroider, spin and cook, but a desire to help the colonials against the king persists, and she conveys the message to Paul Revere (although he admits someone else has already told him the same thing) in the hem of the doll's gown. Finally her father returns, explaining that the Declaration of Independence means that ""America has grown up after a family quarrel. She no longer needs her mother country, England, to tell her what to do""--and it is clear that this daughter of liberty has grown up too. A simple sampler of Americana with historical figures threading their way through.

Pub Date: Nov. 13th, 1967
Publisher: World