A useful, no-nonsense, and detailed blueprint for rescuing your personal finances.

GET THE HELL OUT OF DEBT

THE PROVEN 3-PHASE METHOD THAT WILL RADICALLY SHIFT YOUR RELATIONSHIP TO MONEY

A debut guide focuses on getting out of debt and increasing personal net worth.

“If you carry consumer debt and you feel trapped in the cycle of minimum payments and maxed out accounts,” writes Kelly in her book, “you are right where the system wants you to be.” Setting aside the old advice of always having six months of rent and expenses in a savings account (and noting how inadequate the pandemic showed that counsel to be), the author seeks in these pages to show her readers some new ways to think about personal finance and the elimination of debt. The recurrent theme running through all her recommendations is the value of knowledge: Readers are urged to review their financial numbers until those figures are familiar rather than intimidating or depressing. “I want you to have comfort and ease with your numbers,” she writes. “But that comes from first getting acquainted with them, and then getting intimate.” Throughout the book, she’s unflinchingly realistic, acknowledging that once her readers have totaled up their entire net worth, they may likely realize they are very, very broke. To address these and other cold realities, Kelly provides a recovery strategy in three phases: planning, paying off consumer debt, and, most importantly, following up these two by investing and building wealth, so as not to fall back into the debt cycle again. The author has been on both sides of the problem she’s describing, having once been over $2 million in debt and having also taught budgeting for many years to clients whose personal finances were a mess. This depth of experience, combined with her friendly, completely encouraging tone, gives her manual an approachability often missing from books of this kind. Readers in all states of financial disrepair will find sound, helpful, and illuminating advice in these pages.

A useful, no-nonsense, and detailed blueprint for rescuing your personal finances.

Pub Date: July 20, 2021

ISBN: 978-1-64-293955-2

Page Count: 320

Publisher: Post Hill Press

Review Posted Online: July 1, 2021

Kirkus Reviews Issue: Aug. 15, 2021

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A handful of pearls amid a pile of empty oyster shells.

THE COMFORT BOOK

Bestselling author Haig offers a book’s worth of apothegms to serve as guides to issues ranging from disquietude to self-acceptance.

Like many collections of this sort—terse snippets of advice, from the everyday to the cosmic—some parts will hit home with surprising insight, some will feel like old hat, and others will come across as disposable or incomprehensible. Years ago, Haig experienced an extended period of suicidal depression, so he comes at many of these topics—pain, hope, self-worth, contentment—from a hard-won perspective. This makes some of the material worthy of a second look, even when it feels runic or contrary to experience. The author’s words are instigations, hopeful first steps toward illumination. Most chapters are only a few sentences long, the longest running for three pages. Much is left unsaid and left up to readers to dissect. On being lost, Haig recounts an episode with his father when they got turned around in a forest in France. His father said to him, “If we keep going in a straight line we’ll get out of here.” He was correct, a bit of wisdom Haig turned to during his depression when he focused on moving forward: “It is important to remember the bottom of the valley never has the clearest view. And that sometimes all you need to do in order to rise up again is to keep moving forward.” Many aphorisms sound right, if hardly groundbreaking—e.g., a quick route to happiness is making someone else happy; “No is a good word. It keeps you sane. In an age of overload, no is really yes. It is yes to having space you need to live”; “External events are neutral. They only gain positive or negative value the moment they enter our mind.” Haig’s fans may enjoy this one, but others should take a pass.

A handful of pearls amid a pile of empty oyster shells.

Pub Date: July 6, 2021

ISBN: 978-0-14-313666-8

Page Count: 272

Publisher: Penguin Life

Review Posted Online: May 19, 2021

Kirkus Reviews Issue: June 1, 2021

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Smart, engaging sportswriting—good reading for organization builders as well as Pats fans.

THE DYNASTY

Action-packed tale of the building of the New England Patriots over the course of seven decades.

Prolific writer Benedict has long blended two interests—sports and business—and the Patriots are emblematic of both. Founded in 1959 as the Boston Patriots, the team built a strategic home field between that city and Providence. When original owner Billy Sullivan sold the flailing team in 1988, it was $126 million in the hole, a condition so dire that “Sullivan had to beg the NFL to release emergency funds so he could pay his players.” Victor Kiam, the razor magnate, bought the long since renamed New England Patriots, but rival Robert Kraft bought first the parking lots and then the stadium—and “it rankled Kiam that he bore all the risk as the owner of the team but virtually all of the revenue that the team generated went to Kraft.” Check and mate. Kraft finally took over the team in 1994. Kraft inherited coach Bill Parcells, who in turn brought in star quarterback Drew Bledsoe, “the Patriots’ most prized player.” However, as the book’s nimbly constructed opening recounts, in 2001, Bledsoe got smeared in a hit “so violent that players along the Patriots sideline compared the sound of the collision to a car crash.” After that, it was backup Tom Brady’s team. Gridiron nerds will debate whether Brady is the greatest QB and Bill Belichick the greatest coach the game has ever known, but certainly they’ve had their share of controversy. The infamous “Deflategate” incident of 2015 takes up plenty of space in the late pages of the narrative, and depending on how you read between the lines, Brady was either an accomplice or an unwitting beneficiary. Still, as the author writes, by that point Brady “had started in 223 straight regular-season games,” an enviable record on a team that itself has racked up impressive stats.

Smart, engaging sportswriting—good reading for organization builders as well as Pats fans.

Pub Date: Sept. 1, 2020

ISBN: 978-1-982134-10-5

Page Count: 592

Publisher: Avid Reader Press

Review Posted Online: Aug. 26, 2020

Kirkus Reviews Issue: Sept. 15, 2020

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