THE TREASURE OF PLEASANT VALLEY by Frank Yerby

THE TREASURE OF PLEASANT VALLEY

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KIRKUS REVIEW

The mixture as before-sex, violence and virtue -- but the setting is changed. For Frank Yerby has deserted the Deep South he knows so well, for a somewhat contrived prod synthetic portraying of the turbulent period of California's Gold Rush. Two lads out of the South have come- for different reasons- to find a fortune in gold. Circumstances turn them to other paths,-Bruce Harkness to farming, which is his life, and Halley Burke to the law, which has its place in the lawless days when violence and death and graft prevailed. Bruce has run off from the love of the woman who had refused to wait for him- and married another; but he nurses the hope she will come to him- and resists Juans, wife of the Mexican Pepe, Bruce's comrade and friend. Then Jo comes- seeking divorce from Peterson- looking for Bruce, whom she is told is dead. There you have the set up, and it builds to a turgid climax, in which violent death and incredible heroism ultimately free Bruce and Juana for marriage and happiness. At the end even Jo does a generous thing. Fast paced story telling with slick manipulation of the strings that pull the characters to do his will- Yerby once again comes through with a tale that will rent. For his addicts.

Pub Date: Sept. 9th, 1955
Publisher: Dial