METHODISTS LINKING TWO CONTINENTS by Friederich Wunderlich

METHODISTS LINKING TWO CONTINENTS

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KIRKUS REVIEW

This is really a series of biographical essays about six men who are largely responsible for the founding of the German Methodist Church, a church which survived the first and second world wars without the complete disruption of Christian brotherhood, and which is now commemorating the Centennial of this Church by German Americans who found in Methodism the warmth of a personal religion missed in Lutheranism. It began in Bremen and almost immediately found a warming welcome. Those who delight in stories of spiritual adventures will respond to these human stories of men who risked everything, and met with all sorts of danger and hardships in bringing a freer gospel to their own people; Methodists should be glad to read these pages from their history so largely unknown in this country, and feel a closer bond with their brothers overseas. Since the war there has come into being closer co-operation in enterprises between the State and the Free Church. Bishop Friedrich Wunderlich, who has written these essays, tells about it in an Epilogue. Church historians, Methodist or not, should welcome this denominational story which succeeds in being more ecumenical than partisan, thanks to the genuine convictions of its early founders, Nast, Jacoby, Wunderlich, Nippert and Nuelson.

Pub Date: Jan. 11th, 1960
Publisher: Methodist Church-Board of Publications