PRIVATE POWER AND AMERICAN DEMOCRACY by Grant McConnell

PRIVATE POWER AND AMERICAN DEMOCRACY

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KIRKUS REVIEW

One of the favored premises of American political philosophy, such as it is, is the great value of the small constituency. Grant McConnell in this study explores this conception and finds that the small constituency, rather than having offered a mainstay of democracy, has worked against the interest of its members and the nation as a whole. The primary targets of this analysis are the various federal regulatory boards and commissions which either have their private advisory boards or which generate in the private sector of the economy the association which will only represent parts of the groups to be regulated or affected. Generally these associations are undemocratic in their structure and powerful in their dealings with the government. The result is that much legislation designed to provide regulation based on the progressive view of the public interest is in fact administered with the interests of only a very few being served. Professor's McConnell's study is thorough though at times he seems to go into somewhat remote areas for his examples. It is addressed primarily to the student of political science and economy.

Pub Date: May 16th, 1966
Publisher: Knopf