ASSIGNMENT TO BERLIN by Harry W. Flannery
Kirkus Star

ASSIGNMENT TO BERLIN

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KIRKUS REVIEW

Listed as a ""dark horse"" for two reasons:- Flannery, as Shirer's successor in Berlin, has a pre-publication press value that is sure of a good starter; second, the book is packed with interesting material for the historic record -- though the handling lacks the vigor and drama and literary quality of the Shirer. The text is revealing in showing the Nazi technique of handling broadcasting, news, etc. as well as the broader revelation of horror, oppression, secrecy, misrepresentation, propaganda for world domination. He recounts his personal experiences not only in Berlin but in other parts of Central Europe; he traces the campaign of the Balkans, the entrance of the Russian campaign, and so on. Written almost too baldly and objectively, with too little est and emotion. The thing that interested as most was the sense one gets of his own growth in his job, his insight into the tempo of the people, his faith in victory.

Pub Date: June 29th, 1942
Publisher: Knopf