EDGAR CAYCE-- The Sleeping Prophet by Jess Stearn

EDGAR CAYCE-- The Sleeping Prophet

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KIRKUS REVIEW

It is now many years (1943) since Thomas Sugrue's committed biography of Edgar Cayce, There Is a River--Sugrue was Cayce's friend and patient and proselytizer, and since Stearn seems equally convinced that Cayce was the ""greatest mystic America had even known""--perhaps the greatest justification for his version is the follow-through on some of his predictions which the years have made possible. Even though 1936 does not really seem to have been validated as the ""most critical year"" in international relations, even though Atlantis (a favorite field of speculation for Cayce) has not risen, still there are some startling parallels. Geologically, there have been certain cataclysmic changes he foresaw: in health (Cayce's health readings--all performed in a deep trance-- are startling) the great healer did indicate a cancer cure from the blood of a rabbit recently sponsored by a team of doctors at Wayne State University (careful--""an apparent cure""). Cayce functioned in many areas--left a legacy of beliefs (reincarnation for one) as well as home remedies from a little black book and for all those who contended that he was a fraud, or freak, he did have a fantastic career as a clairvoyant and a devoted following. This, however, has none of the personal intimacy/immediacy factors of Sugrue's book which has kept it in print and reprint editions through the years.

ISBN: 0553260855
Publisher: Doubleday