GOOD LUCK TO THE RIDER by Joan Phipson

GOOD LUCK TO THE RIDER

By
Email this review

KIRKUS REVIEW

When uncertain girl meets unwanted horse, it's bound to be love at first sight, confidence in the last chapter, but with Joan Phipson putting the familiar plot through its paces almost every moment counts: twelve-year-old Barbara, ordinarily fearful and undecided, persuading her brothers and sister to save the brumby foal with the leer of a clown, persuading her even more skeptical father to let her raise him; the satisfaction of sitting quietly near him, of slipping a halter on him, eventually of riding him. Unwittingly, at her brother's suggestion, she has named him Rosinante. and by the time she understands the joke she doesn't care; he may never be beautiful but he's quick to learn and a good mount. And he's a natural jumper, which encourages Barbara to school him for the hunts at the Bungaree meet. it's the commitment and the willingness to expose herself and Rozz that matters, of course, but readers will be cheering good luck to the rider as she approaches the hurdles. People and place have personality too, and after the cheering's over youngsters are likely to remember riding across the Australian plains with staunch friend Will and unlike twin brothers Clive and George; they'll also recognize the neighboring Barkers from the author's earlier books.

Pub Date: April 3rd, 1968
Publisher: Harcourt, Brace & World