A HISTORY OF THE LUFTWAFFE by John Killen

A HISTORY OF THE LUFTWAFFE

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KIRKUS REVIEW

The swift rise of the Luftwaffe and its two decisive falls are reliably described here by John Killen, a British engineer with an abiding interest in aircraft. From the early supremacy in World War I of the Fokker fighter plane to the misuse in World War II of the Stuka and jet bomber, Killen's story is one of technological superiority harassed by pride, propaganda, and the ""colossal blunders"" of the German high command. ""In the air war Hitler was indeed our secret weapon ably abetted by Hermann Goering."" the Marshal of the Royal Air Force declares in his introduction to Killen's book, and careful attention is given to the destructive whims of the Fuehrer and the unfortunate cowardice of his Reichsmarshall. The account is chronological, readable, unscholarly, but thorough. Military history buffs will already be familiar with much that is written here, but apparently the book is aimed at professional airmen. Again, according to the Marshall of the Royal Air Force, Killen's book ""should certainly find a place on the shelves of all senior officers of the NATO Air Forces.

Pub Date: Sept. 20th, 1968
Publisher: Doubleday