HOUSE ON THE SANDS by John L. Bonn

HOUSE ON THE SANDS

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KIRKUS REVIEW

A substantial and quite staid novel of a convert to Catholicism, this tells of Francis MacNutt, who from his early boyhood in Richmond, Indians, was attracted to this faith in spite of the disapprobation of the grandparents who reared him. However it was not until his first trip to Europe that he made the decision, after fifteen years of certainty, to join the Church, broke with his family at home. Later in Mexico, he was to meet the visionary mystic, Father Vaughan, whose inspirational influence was a lasting one. Returning to Europe, MacNutt continued his religious studies, but at the last moment realized that he was not fit to become a priest. He entered the diplomatic service instead; became a Papal Chamberlain; moved in high circles, ecclesiastical, political, aristocratic; married Margaret who furthered his career which ended with the framing of the Concordat which was to liberate the Pope... The backgrounds here which include a number of distinguished dignitaries lend what interest there is: MacNutt is an almost featureless figure, and his story, beyond its denominational interest, is painfully sober.

Pub Date: Sept. 21st, 1950
Publisher: Doubleday