THE WOMAN WHO WAS POOR by Leon Bloy

THE WOMAN WHO WAS POOR

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KIRKUS REVIEW

The English edition of this novel of Parisian life in the eighties brings to the English-speaking world a powerful and realistic tale of the development of spiritual discernment blossoming out of poverty and degradation. The woman, Clotilde, becomes an artist's model and meets all of the great French literati and impresses them with the depth of her thoughts and emotions. There is much philosophizing along the way, so that the novel do not move with swift and arresting action, but there are passages of great beauty and the character delineation interesting. The book is saturated with Catholic thought and allusions, but is by nomeans just a pietistic tract in novel form, for Leon Bloy was an accomplished novelist.

Publisher: Sheed & Ward