MAN AND NATURE IN AMERICA by

MAN AND NATURE IN AMERICA

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KIRKUS REVIEW

Others may speak of the estrangement between man and man, but a more profound pitfall is the estrangement between man and nature, between the forces of natural harmony and those of technological expansion. Should that continue, our grave may be dug. Such is the warning, anyway, in Arthur Ekirch's study, a hardly impassioned survey- lucid, of course, but what a Milltown manner- of the various socio- economic political and philosophical aspects of the problem from the Taylor-Jefferson Agrarian dream to the ""doom"" lands of Los Alamos. The author touches all bases: he salutes Emerson and Thoreau, Roosevelt's Progressive Era policies, Mumford decrying ""purposeless materialism"", Harrison Brown's ""stability through voluntary control of population"", and a number of people, including Krutch and Seidenberg, on a modus vivendi between the individual and the machine. Man must share in nature, not destroy it. All very true, but the exhortation has really neither bang nor whimper.

Publisher: Columbia Univ. Press