THE CANDY BUTCHER'S FAREWELL by Lester Goran

THE CANDY BUTCHER'S FAREWELL

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KIRKUS REVIEW

Goran's third novel which in more than its title is reminiscent of his first, The Paratrooper of Mechanic Avenue, again, and a little like the late Edward Lewis Wallant, deals with the destitute in exceptional, pectic terms. The story carries Henry Sneffer Jr. through his boyhood up to his 18th year in 1945. Henry's mother was a ""nurse,"" that is she lived with men mainly for money. When she died, Henry was always searching for his father. He goes to live with an uncle and aunt and Henry's high school days as a basketball center are related with tremendous zest through Henry's eyes, wide windows of imagination. Eventually he finds his father who is a candy butcher at the Mystic Theater in Atlantic City (selling Crackerjacks-- and ""dirty"" pictures). And the ""candy butcher's farewell"" is when his father absconds with $1700 for the Miss America contest... An often beautiful book with a tremendous sense of life which gives it immediacy as well as a sense of perpetuity.

Pub Date: Sept. 1st, 1964
Publisher: McGraw-Hill