THE DAY I MET A LION by MacKinlay Kantor

THE DAY I MET A LION

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KIRKUS REVIEW

Mostly people, and one dog, populate MacKinlay Kantor's collection of personalia. There are heroes: the ""lion"" of the title, Carl Ackley, who understood a young boy's need and remembered him before his school-mates; sailor Dave who ministered to twenty-six men with flu in the Dry Tortugas, alone; Frankie, the stewardess who returned eleven times to a burning plane to save her passengers--one time too many; the cops of the Twenty-third precinct. There are personalities: the ubiquitous Mr. Vertigo, eternal Mr. Fix-it; Willie Crawford, who ""found life good, and left it better;"" Al Jolson. There are stories of London in the blitz and service with the 305th; recollections of a memorable teacher, known as Miss Bed Slats, and of the America of 1917. Also a piece on the telling of bawdy stories and some mention of Andersonville. It reads along easily enough.

Pub Date: Feb. 2nd, 1967
Publisher: Doubleday