A NAIL MERCHANT AT NIGHTFALL by Mika Waltari

A NAIL MERCHANT AT NIGHTFALL

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KIRKUS REVIEW

A tour de force which may, just possibly, capture the fancy of those looking for something in the vein of allegory, fantasy. With tongue in cheek, the author of The Egyptian takes his readers into the mind of the creative artist, plagued by creatures demanding birth, sidetracked by the erratic behaviour of his own heart, mind and emotions. He sees himself as a materialist, a nail merchant, who has decided to retire, but whose neglected heart returns to plague him and whose imagination haunts him with the figures of the unborn, in this particular of an aging Egyptian, Sinuhe. He leaves his heart with a beautiful friend and goes off with his dog to the lakeside to bring his Egyptians to life. The fourth sunset finds him accepting defeat, the impermanence of love, the importance of good food, a good wife, a good bed and a good book. There are bits of poetic writing here. But the appeal is special.

Pub Date: April 25th, 1955
Publisher: Putnam