EUROPEAN UNIFICATION IN THE SIXTIES by Miriam Camps

EUROPEAN UNIFICATION IN THE SIXTIES

By
Email this review

KIRKUS REVIEW

In this detailed account of the European Economic Community's quest for greater and permanent unity, President De Gaulle of France again plays the role to which he has been assigned by many American political scholars-- that of the villain. The first half of this study deals with the monkey wrench he has thrown into EEC negotiations during the last few years. It is assumed that he thought that France's power as a nation would be diminished by greater European Community decisions, and thus his diplomatic sabotage of the 1954-1955 round of talks. But, Miss Camps argues, the jump from common tariffs to common politics is a necessary one if Europe is to emerge as part of a new and more peaceful world order. And she becomes more optimistic when dealing with Britain's position toward the Community which takes up the second half of the work in progress here. Still, not even an account of Labour's election campaigns can raise the text above the tedious analysis to which only the most serious students will apply themselves and which De Gaulle's defendants will contest or avoid.

Publisher: McGraw-Hill