THE SAMARITAN by Mason Cross
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: Feb. 15, 2016

"Fans of Jeffery Deaver—that other thrill-master who can't resist piling on the climactic twists even as the lights are coming up and you're looking for your umbrella—should be enthralled."
Carter Blake, the "locating consultant" who made such a splash in his debut (The Killing Season, 2015), returns to help locate a bad boy who's been awfully busy for an awfully long time. Read full book review >
NO SHRED OF EVIDENCE by Charles Todd
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: Feb. 16, 2016

"The haunted detective is as thorough as usual, though he's dealing with faster-moving events than in some of his previous adventures (A Fine Summer's Day, 2015, etc.). There's no peace for the man and only a teaser of romantic feelings he scarcely admits."
A pleasure expedition in Cornwall turns deadly in Inspector Rutledge's 18th case. Read full book review >

APRICOT'S REVENGE by Song Ying
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: Feb. 16, 2016

"Rooting contemporary crimes in government-sanctioned corruption is nothing new for American writers, but Ying's tale marks something new and welcome in Chinese fiction."
Chinese writer Ying's first appearance in English challenges the Y District Criminal Division to uncover the disturbing motive for the murder of a real estate tycoon. Read full book review >
MIDNIGHT SUN by Jo Nesbø
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: Feb. 16, 2016

"Wasting not a word, Nesbø (Blood on Snow, 2015, etc.) paints an indelible portrait of a criminal loser who reflects when he's faced with the supreme threat to his existence that 'it was actually hard to think of anyone who was more dispensable than me.'"
The world's worst hit man goes aground in a little Norwegian town far above the Arctic Circle in this sharp, spare, postcard-sized tale. Read full book review >
THE BLOOD STRAND by Chris Ould
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: Feb. 16, 2016

"In this first of a planned trilogy, Ould introduces a complicated if perhaps excessively prickly hero whose faults are mostly redeemed by the locked-room allure of the locale."
Returning to the Faroe Islands of his birth, a British police detective seeks to unravel his complicated family history and becomes embroiled in a murder investigation. Read full book review >

THE BIG FEAR by Andrew Case
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: Feb. 23, 2016

"The case is slow to gather momentum but rises to an improbable, rousing finale in which the bad guys, who've been consistently more clever and resourceful than the good guys, finally get theirs."
Playwright Case's first novel plunges a New York cop and the man charged with investigating him into a world of trouble. Read full book review >
OUT OF THE BLUES by Trudy Nan Boyce
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: Feb. 23, 2016

"Less whodunit than odyssey, as Salt—clearly bent, as Wills observes, on fixing the world one sociopath at a time—navigates anti-woman prejudice in her unit, anti-cop sentiment in her hometown, and the steaming corruption that reaches from Atlanta's lower depths to its very top."
A veteran Atlanta cop's debut novel presents a newly minted homicide detective who's struggling to keep her sights trained on the cold case she's been assigned while Atlanta seethes around her. Read full book review >
MONTALBANO'S FIRST CASE by Andrea Camilleri
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: Feb. 23, 2016

"Series fans will especially enjoy learning the origins of Montalbano and company. Though the title story is a bit low-stakes, newcomers may be sufficiently intrigued by Camilleri's droll humor and nifty storytelling to check out the rest of the series."
In the long title story that opens this collection, Camilleri shows sardonic Sicilian Inspector Montalbano, years before he became rumpled and stricken by a perpetual midlife crisis, with vigor and swag. Read full book review >
WEDDING CAKE MURDER by Joanne Fluke
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: Feb. 23, 2016

"Since the interplay between Hannah and Ross has even less sex appeal than the Baking Conversion Chart at the end of the volume, any interest in whether they do finally get hitched is strictly pro forma. At least there are 22 recipes."
Even in the world of desserts, competition can be murder, as Hannah Swensen discovers on the eve of her nuptials. Read full book review >
DEATH OF A NURSE by M.C. Beaton
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: Feb. 23, 2016

"The latest appearance by the charming Scot (Death of a Liar, 2015, etc.) provides all the quirky characters and striking Highlands scenery you could want, along with one of Beaton's most successful mysteries."
Beaton's unambitious but talented police hero continues to be attracted to all the wrong women. Read full book review >
A MIDSUMMER'S EQUATION by Keigo Higashino
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: Feb. 23, 2016

"Less playful and more labored than its predecessors but just as ingenious in working one twist after another in a case that seems absolutely twist-proof."
The third case for Tokyo homicide detective Shunpei Kusanagi and professor Manabu Yukawa, who teaches physics at Imperial University, takes them far away from Tokyo—and far back from the present day as well. Read full book review >
WHEN BUNNIES GO BAD by Clea Simon
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: March 1, 2016

"Not much of a secret at all, it turns out. Fans will know better than to expect much mystery to get in the way of Pru's communications—however cryptic this time around—with the animals she loves."
The sixth entry in Simon's Pet Noir series (Kittens Can Kill, 2015, etc.) is just as blanc as the first five. Read full book review >
Kirkus Interview
Michael Eric Dyson
February 2, 2016

In Michael Eric Dyson’s rich and nuanced book new book, The Black Presidency: Barack Obama and the Politics of Race in America, Dyson writes with passion and understanding about Barack Obama’s “sad and disappointing” performance regarding race and black concerns in his two terms in office. While race has defined his tenure, Obama has been “reluctant to take charge” and speak out candidly about the nation’s racial woes, determined to remain “not a black leader but a leader who is black.” Dyson cogently examines Obama’s speeches and statements on race, from his first presidential campaign through recent events—e.g., the Ferguson riots and the eulogy for the Rev. Clementa Pinckney in Charleston—noting that the president is careful not to raise the ire of whites and often chastises blacks for their moral failings. At his best, he spoke with “special urgency for black Americans” during the Ferguson crisis and was “at his blackest,” breaking free of constraints, in his “Amazing Grace” Charleston eulogy. Dyson writes here as a realistic, sometimes-angry supporter of the president. View video >