Mystery & Crime Book Reviews (page 931)

THE PAPERBOY by Pete Dexter
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: Jan. 1, 1995

"A big story laid out in a workmanlike manner, but thematically fickle."
Since winning the National Book Award in 1988 for Paris Trout, Dexter (Brotherly Love, 1991, etc.) has tried, without success, to recapture that novel's intensity. Read full book review >
VANISHING ACT by Thomas Perry
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: Jan. 1, 1995

"A fine thriller, and Whitefield surely warrants a return appearance."
A most intriguing heroine, with an even more intriguing vocation, is the centerpiece for what could be Perry's most successful thriller since his Edgar-winning debut, Butcher's Boy (1982). Read full book review >

THE WEATHERMAN by Steve Thayer
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: Jan. 1, 1995

"No mystery, but a rich, darkly overplotted saga that will wring you dry of tears for every last member of the sorry cast. (First printing of 60,000; Book-of-the-Month Club selection; $50,000 ad/promo; author tour)"
Minneapolis/St. Read full book review >
BERTIE AND THE CRIME OF PASSION by Peter Lovesey
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: Jan. 1, 1995

"Foolish, lighthearted Bertie's distinctive edges have worn so smooth by now that he seems no more quaint than any other historical detective, and hardly more than any detective at all."
Over the epistolary protests of his wife in Copenhagen, Bertie, the Prince of Wales (Bertie and the Seven Bodies, 1990, etc.), is up to his stiff upper lip in murder again. Read full book review >
PLAYING HAPPY FAMILIES by Julian Symons
MYSTERY & CRIME
Released: Jan. 1, 1995

"But this time, Symons, whose many chapters of suburban woe have often been marred by his scathing contempt for his characters, shows a welcome charity that makes this his strongest novel in years."
The doyen of British mystery (Something Like a Love Affair, 1992, etc.) celebrates the 50th anniversary of his first novel by tracing the numberless effects of chipper Jenny Midway's sudden disappearance on her cozy little family. Read full book review >

SLINGSHOT by Jack D. Hunter
MYSTERY & CRIME
Released: Jan. 1, 1995

"All right, the characters, from barefoot millionaire Coop on down, have no more depth than Popsicle sticks, but wily old pro Hunter (Sweeney's Run, 1992, etc.) knows how to keep things hot for them."
What makes this whodunit more, or different, than a whodunit is that whoever killed journalist Matt Cooper's father may be out to overthrow the US government as well. Read full book review >
GRAND SLAM by Susan Moody
MYSTERY & CRIME
Released: Jan. 1, 1995

"A clever enough gambit filled out to novel length by spurious cultural references—Keats is romantically linked to Fanny Burney- -and too much background on the heroine."
Cassandra Swann's bridge class at Bellington Prison has stirred up an unlovely stew. Read full book review >
THE WIZARD OF LA-LA LAND by Robert Campbell
MYSTERY & CRIME
Released: Jan. 1, 1995

"As you'd expect from veteran Hollywooder Campbell (Sweet La-La Land, 1990, etc.), there's crisply paced narration and a memorably grotesque supporting cast, but the penny-dreadful wallows sink them all in the end."
AIDS victim Kenny Gotch, a.k.a. Read full book review >
STAND-UP by Robert J. Randisi
MYSTERY & CRIME
Released: Dec. 19, 1994

"Though Miles does rouse himself to do some actual detective work on both cases before he hangs up his hat, the biggest mystery here is why Walker Blue would ever want this nebbish for a partner."
Walker Blue, New York City's premier investigator, wants to take on Miles Jacoby as a partner, but first Miles (Hard Look, 1993, etc.) has to clear his ledger of two cases. Read full book review >
THE SENSATIONAL MUSIC CLUB MYSTERY by Graham Landrum
MYSTERY & CRIME
Released: Dec. 19, 1994

"The leisurely pace and tag-team narration of Harriet and her friends work against the more obvious kinds of suspense, but Harriet is delightful as she patiently rousts the skeletons from the Gaulton closets."
Monica Taybrook Gaulton has a wealthy old husband, the proceeds from her sale of the Gaulton family furniture and silver, a mysterious past as a Las Vegas entertainer, and a bellyful of cyanide she swallowed moments before she was to serve as emcee for the Borderville (Va. and Tenn.) Read full book review >
DRESSED TO KILL by Margaret Duffy
MYSTERY & CRIME
Released: Dec. 16, 1994

"Plucky, angry Mackenzie in particular would be well worth a sequel."
How can the loss of the Chantbury Pyx, a priceless reliquary stolen from a Bath gallery, be related to the murder of Mrs. Pryce, a vicious old biddy whose complaint to Lance Tyler's private inquiry agency about flowers purloined from her garden makes it all too easy for Tyler's partner, Joanna Mackenzie, to identify her when she's struck down with a hammer? Read full book review >
DEATH TAKES TIME by Roderic Jeffries
MYSTERY & CRIME
Released: Dec. 16, 1994

Two murders that mightn't look like murder to anyone but Mallorca's sharp-eyed Inspector Enrique Alvarez (Murder Confounded, 1993, etc.). Read full book review >
Kirkus Interview
Clinton Kelly
January 9, 2017

Bestselling author and television host Clinton Kelly’s memoir I Hate Everyone Except You is a candid, deliciously snarky collection of essays about his journey from awkward kid to slightly-less-awkward adult. Clinton Kelly is probably best known for teaching women how to make their butts look smaller. But in I Hate Everyone, Except You, he reveals some heretofore-unknown secrets about himself, like that he’s a finicky connoisseur of 1980s pornography, a disillusioned critic of New Jersey’s premier water parks, and perhaps the world’s least enthused high-school commencement speaker. Whether he’s throwing his baby sister in the air to jumpstart her cheerleading career or heroically rescuing his best friend from death by mud bath, Clinton leaps life’s social hurdles with aplomb. With his signature wit, he shares his unique ability to navigate the stickiest of situations, like deciding whether it’s acceptable to eat chicken wings with a fork on live television (spoiler: it’s not). “A thoroughly light and entertaining memoir,” our critic writes. View video >