Mystery Thriller Book Reviews (page 1592)

GREEN RIPPER by John D. MacDonald
MYSTERY THRILLER
Released: Sept. 17, 1979

Travis McGee, aging and mellowing, is ready to settle down at last with the lusciously tall Gretel (The Empty Copper Sea)—who may just agree to marry him. Read full book review >
THE DEAD ZONE by Stephen King
MYSTERY THRILLER
Released: Aug. 16, 1979

"Yes, the King byline will ensure a sizeable turnout, but the word will soon get around that the author of Carrie has this time churned out a ho-hum dud."
The Stand did less well than The Shining, and The Dead Zone will do less well than either—as the King of high horror (Carrie) continues to move away from the grand-gothic strain that once distinguished him from the other purveyors of psychic melodrama. Read full book review >

A BEND IN THE RIVER by V.S. Naipaul
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: May 16, 1979

"This should have been an essay, perhaps, and one or two short stories; as a novel, it's listless—as a framework for ideas, it's never less than provocative."
THE JERICHO COMMANDMENT by James Patterson
MYSTERY THRILLER
Released: April 9, 1979

"Dachau Two' indeed, because, though hero David does ultimately prevent total carnage, the author clearly panders to paranoia and revenge-lust throughout; and this sort of junk hysteria can only be bad news for those with genuine, serious concern about today's anti-Semitism."
The latest, and surely the most confused, in a recent flurry of novels that seem to be competing for selection by the Jewish Defense League (JDL) Read full book review >
CASEBOOK OF THE BLACK WIDOWERS by Isaac Asimov
MYSTERY THRILLER
Released: Jan. 4, 1979

"So these are stories for a very limited audience—those with a taste for miniature game-playing, eager (but not genuinely erudite) dinner conversation, and Asimov's incorrigible verbal playfulness."
The third collection of Asimov's "Black Widowers" stories from Ellery Queen's Mystery Magazine—each tale consisting of 90% talk as the yakky Widowers discuss a crime puzzle over their fancy club dinners; as Asimov admits, "the mysteries, as mysteries, can be described, discussed, and solved in about a quarter of the space I devote to each." Read full book review >

THE COUP by John Updike
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: Dec. 7, 1978

"As serious work, even serious comedy, it never invites any species of emotional involvement—and never straightens out its curlicues enough to hit home."
Updike's long interest in African literature was bound to up and produce something like this eventually. Read full book review >
THE STAND by Stephen King
MYSTERY THRILLER
Released: Nov. 3, 1978

"Some King fans will be put off by the pretensions here; most will embrace them along with the earthier chilis."
Striking a far less hysterical tone than in The Shining, King has written his most sweeping horror novel in The Stand, though it may lack the spinal jingles of Salem's Lot. Read full book review >
EMPTY COPPER SEA by John D. MacDonald
MYSTERY THRILLER
Released: Sept. 25, 1978

"Reliable plus."
Travis McGee #17—and everything's ship-shape down Florida way. Read full book review >
THE JUDAS GOAT by Robert B. Parker
MYSTERY THRILLER
Released: Aug. 2, 1978

"Hey, Spenser, go back to Boston where you belong and, for Pete's sake, stop whimpering!"
Bad news for Spenser fans. Read full book review >
EYE OF THE NEEDLE by Ken Follett
MYSTERY THRILLER
Released: July 31, 1978

"As it is, Eye of the Needle introduces a fresh if not especially distinctive voice in suspense—and is easily the best first novel in the espionage genre since The Day of the Jackal."
Graham Greene he's not. Read full book review >
THE HUMAN FACTOR by Graham Greene
MYSTERY THRILLER
Released: March 1, 1978

"What remains is a story as apparently plain as Greene's perfect prose—an open-hearted, tight-lipped pavane of conscience and sentiment that can be watched and enjoyed for all the wrong, and all the right, reasons."
A man in love walks through the world like an anarchist, carrying a time bomb." Read full book review >
THE HONOURABLE SCHOOLBOY by John le Carré
MYSTERY THRILLER
Released: Sept. 1, 1977

"But if Le Carre is the Henry lames of spy novelists, firing more nuances than bullets, this is his Golden Bowl—dense, hard, and gleaming on the outside, clark within, and worth possessing whatever the price."
The aftermath of Tinker, Tailor, Soldier, Spy: the ascendancy of spychief George Smiley, the wholesale dismantling and piecemeal rebuilding of Britain's betrayed intelligence service, and Le Carre's longest, deepest, and quietest incisions into the gentlemen who steal secrets, hide bodies, and rarely blink. Read full book review >
Kirkus Interview
Katey Sagal
author of GRACE NOTES
April 10, 2017

In her memoir Grace Notes, actress and singer/songwriter Katey Sagal takes you through the highs and lows of her life, from the tragic deaths of her parents to her long years in the Los Angeles rock scene, from being diagnosed with cancer at the age of twenty-eight to getting her big break on the fledgling FOX network as the wise-cracking Peggy Bundy on the beloved sitcom Married…with Children. Sparse and poetic, Grace Notes is an emotionally riveting tale of struggle and success, both professional and personal: Sagal’s path to sobriety; the stillbirth of her first daughter, Ruby; motherhood; the experience of having her third daughter at age 52 with the help of a surrogate; and her lifelong passion for music. “While this book is sure to please the author’s many fans, its thoughtful, no-regrets honesty will no doubt also appeal to readers of Hollywood memoirs seeking substance that goes beyond gossip and name-dropping,” our critic writes. “A candid, reflective memoir.” View video >