Mystery Thriller Book Reviews (page 1592)

O'FEAR by Peter Corris
MYSTERY THRILLER
Released: Nov. 26, 1991

"So-so, with odd quirks of syntax and less rush-of-adrenalin heroics than in recent Aussie imports, such as those from Charles West."
The American debut of a long-running series (a dozen titles) starring Aussie p.i. Read full book review >
SET-UP by Maxine O’Callaghan
MYSTERY THRILLER
Released: Nov. 25, 1991

"Two-dimensional characters, plus predictable plotting, don't help much either."
Orange County investigator Delilah West (Hit and Run, 1989) returns, better fed, better bedded, but duller. Read full book review >

EAST IS EAST by Emma Lathan
MYSTERY THRILLER
Released: Nov. 22, 1991

"An unusually clever, often riotously funny performance by the acknowledged master of murder among the M.B.A.s."
Banker-sleuth John Putnam Thatcher gets dragooned during his Japanese trip into authorizing giant Lackawanna Electric's sale of tiny, red-hot British robotics affiliate Midland Research to the Yanezawa Trading Corporation—all in return for a pile of cash and the vital authorization from the Ministry of International Trade and Investment (MITI) to sell electric generators in Japan. Read full book review >
MISS MELVILLE RIDES A TIGER by Evelyn E. Smith
MYSTERY THRILLER
Released: Nov. 22, 1991

"Miss Melville has become a played-out, charmless bore, in a story silly beyond words."
A fourth outing for 50-ish Susan Melville (Miss Melville Regrets, etc.)—painter, heiress, respected member of old-line society, and ex-hired-gun. Read full book review >
ROMAN BLOOD by Steven Saylor
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: Nov. 22, 1991

"More genuine mystery and detection than in Ron Burns's Roman Nights (see above), with two handsome surprises saved for last."
From the papers of Marcus Tullius Cicero comes this first novel, a fictionalization of the immortal Roman orator's first important case—his defense of well-heeled farmer Sextus Roscius on the charge of killing his bated father. Read full book review >

FAREWELL TO THE FLESH by Edward Sklepowich
MYSTERY THRILLER
Released: Nov. 21, 1991

"Just the thing for readers who think Ngaio Marsh died too young."
The stabbing of photographer Valentine Gibbon at the height of the Venetian carnevale seems tailor-made for amateur sleuth Urbino Macintryre and his friend and confidante Barbara, Countess da Capo- Zendrini (Death in a Serene City, 1990), especially after revelations about Val's tirelessly sub rosa financial and sexual activities implicate his current lover Hazel Reeve; Barbara's old schoolmate Berenice Pillow, and her gay stepson Tonio Vico; Dora Spaak, Val's fellow-lodger among the nuns at Casa Crispina, and her brother Nicholas and mother Stella Maris Spaak; and self-styled spiritualist Xenia Campi, who spends all her time passing out leaflets condemning the commercialism of the carnevale (``Venice is not Disney World!''). Read full book review >
BAGGED by Jo Bailey
MYSTERY THRILLER
Released: Nov. 20, 1991

"Repetitive, and if an EKG were as flat as this author's style, there'd be no question but that the patient was absolutely dead."
A clever premise—hiding a body in a hospital morgue—quickly dissipates into murder-by-formula in this first-of-a-series featuring General Jack, a big-city hospital. Read full book review >
THE YEAR'S BEST MYSTERY AND SUSPENSE STORIES 1991 by Edward D. Hoch
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: Nov. 20, 1991

"Includes awards' lists; necrology; short-story bibliography."
Long-time anthologist Hoch this time includes all five Edgar- nominated stories in his ``Best'' compilation, and Lynne Barrett's ``Elvis Lives,'' the ultimate Edgar winner—a dark, garish look at the Presley-impersonator industry—is reason enough to own the book. Read full book review >
HIDDEN CITY by Jim DeBrosse
MYSTERY THRILLER
Released: Nov. 19, 1991

"A better-than-average airplane book that deftly interweaves the scourge of the Middle Ages with tribal lore and the current obsession for land-grabbing."
Rick Decker, crusading reporter on the Cincinnati Eagle (The Serpentine Wall, 1988), now tackles the bubonic plague—and almost succumbs to it himself. Read full book review >
TYPHOON by Mark Joseph
MYSTERY THRILLER
Released: Nov. 19, 1991

"For those who can ignore the already dated politics: a tense, tight naval thriller."
Hard-line Soviet submarine commanders rattle their rockets and threaten the future of democracy in the decaying empire. Read full book review >
THE LAST GOOD GERMAN by Bill Granger
MYSTERY THRILLER
Released: Nov. 19, 1991

"Readers who fail to follow the intricacies are likely to find themselves getting irritated at the literary mannerisms peculiar to this series."
Granger's November Man (League of Terror, 1990, etc.) returns to tangle with an unreconstructed, East German spymaster and with his own thoroughly unpleasant boss. Read full book review >
INFECTED BE THE AIR by Janice Law
MYSTERY THRILLER
Released: Nov. 18, 1991

"Cleverly plotted, swiftly paced escapism that holds the reader to the last page and marks a leap forward from the author's Anna Peters series (The Big Payoff, etc.)."
Sturdy, resilient Alice Bertram is struggling, along with teenage children Doug and Julie, to build a normal life after divorcing brilliant, philandering teacher-writer Max. Read full book review >
Kirkus Interview
Katey Sagal
author of GRACE NOTES
April 10, 2017

In her memoir Grace Notes, actress and singer/songwriter Katey Sagal takes you through the highs and lows of her life, from the tragic deaths of her parents to her long years in the Los Angeles rock scene, from being diagnosed with cancer at the age of twenty-eight to getting her big break on the fledgling FOX network as the wise-cracking Peggy Bundy on the beloved sitcom Married…with Children. Sparse and poetic, Grace Notes is an emotionally riveting tale of struggle and success, both professional and personal: Sagal’s path to sobriety; the stillbirth of her first daughter, Ruby; motherhood; the experience of having her third daughter at age 52 with the help of a surrogate; and her lifelong passion for music. “While this book is sure to please the author’s many fans, its thoughtful, no-regrets honesty will no doubt also appeal to readers of Hollywood memoirs seeking substance that goes beyond gossip and name-dropping,” our critic writes. “A candid, reflective memoir.” View video >