SING PLANTS FOR HEALING by Nelson oon

SING PLANTS FOR HEALING

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KIRKUS REVIEW

The publication of Using Wayside Plants precipitated questions on other aspects of the subject and this book, which combines extensive study and research, is the result. Important in approaching this text is the realization that it is not a how-to-book. No one can set himself up as a herbal doctor on the basis of it. But anyone interested in our native plants will find the subject fascinating reading. Briefly, the body of the text is introduced by an explanation of the basic principles, the historical background, the scope of the study -- and how to use its findings. It is not a guide nor a medical encyclopedia, but it does highlight the new trends of modern chemotherapy and the tremendous revival of interest today, a swing away from the repudiation of plant remedies, to a return to plant-based drugs. A section on securing and preparing plants for medicinal use: a glossary of terms; a selective list of 200 medicinal plants most useful in this area and of 80 additional plants -- out of the thousand generally so identified leads up to an alphabetical listing, illustrated for identification, and with details as to use, value, dangers, and possible application. Some inclusions will surprise the reader: --burdock, jack in the pulpit, puffball, dogwood, skunk cabbage, trillium, viola. While others are vaguely known for specific values or dangers:- digitalis, pokewood, sumac and poison ivy, to be specific. House and garden plants are not ignored.

Pub Date: March 20th, 1963
Publisher: Hearthside Press