THE GREAT SALAD OIL SWINDLE by Norman C. Miller
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THE GREAT SALAD OIL SWINDLE

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KIRKUS REVIEW

Fleming's .007 would be hard put to crack the case of Tino De Angelis who gold-fingered a fantastic plot which included international intrigue, the rise and fall of foreign governments, the assassination of an American President (Kennedy), wheeling and dealing with the world's foremost financiers, major banks and trusted Wall Street firms, and one billion tons of nonexistent salad oil. It's one of the greatest confidence coups in history. Miller, a Wall Street Journal reporter who won a Pulitzer for the articles on which this book is based, reconstructs it here and follows De Angelis' rise from butchering hogs in the Bronx to killing bears on the Street, which he eventually rocked, plunging the U.S. into economic chaos. The author's cosmic eye misses little and comes to rest, not unlightly, on the venality of the swindled as well as the swindlers. A strapping story of sure reader interest, particularly for men.

Pub Date: Oct. 5th, 1965
Publisher: Coward-McCann