THE GERMANS CAME TO PARIS by Peter de Polnay

THE GERMANS CAME TO PARIS

By
Email this review

KIRKUS REVIEW

The Hungarian novelist, who was living in Montmartre at the time, writes personally rather than politically of the occupation of Paris and his experiences. Although the material is not new, the presentation is fresh, modest, discerning as to people rather than events. With an almost childlike faith in France and the French army, and wishfully believing the French press, the collapse of France came as an incredible blow. Further disenchantment came with the realization that the German army was anything but weak and exhausted by the years of war. Behaving impeccably for the first two months, Paris discovered it could speak German very well and turned what hostility it had towards the British. But the heroism of England during the Blitz revived the faith of France; and meantime the Germans reverted to their role of bully. de Polnay did not mince words, and became soon suspect, despite his Hungarian nationality, so decided to escape with Nona, an American girl who had stayed on to be with him. Arrested in Marseilles, he spent months in jail, he finally escaped, made his way out of the country illegally and via the Pyrenees and Madrid eventually reached England. Pleasant, first person chronicle.

Pub Date: Oct. 21st, 1943
Publisher: Duell, Sloan & Pearce