THE JUDAIC TRADITION by R. Brasch

THE JUDAIC TRADITION

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KIRKUS REVIEW

This is a rather grandiloquent title for a book designed to answer, simply and in some detail, the question: What is a Jew? Rabbi Brasch gives that answer ably, explaining not only the beliefs, but also the spirit of the Jewish religion -- its genesis, its books, its language, its traditions and customs, and its symbols. A final chapter -- an appendix, really -- serves as a catchall for some fascinating bits of miscellenea, such as the origin of Jewish family names, and the search for the Lost Tribes. The author writes primarily for non-Jews, and he is at pains to destroy some of the age-old myths that persist: that the Jews are not a race, for instance, or that the Pharisees were a ""stiff-necked"" and hypocritical sect. In the same spirit, he cites the manifestations, in the Christian churches, of the Judaic tradition, both in doctrine and in ritual, thereby bringing to light a cultural bond that too often escapes both Jew and Gentile. An enlightening and enlightened work, suitable both for reading and for reference, which should be in every religious collection.

Pub Date: June 27th, 1969
Publisher: McKay