THE WARRIOR SAINT by R. V. C. Bodley

THE WARRIOR SAINT

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KIRKUS REVIEW

The author of Wind in the Sahara returns to the lonely African wastes in his story of Charles Foucauld, French priest and patriot, who spent the years of his mission among the Twareg as monk-Marabout, scholar, military observer until he was martyred during the political battle for the Sahara in 1916. The saint's story is not only one of a self discipline more severe than that of the Trappist order to which he belonged, nor is it only one of a compassionate counselor. Charles, Vicomte de Foucauld, spent the first thirty years of his life as a profligate libertine who ate, drank, and loved to surfeit while exhibiting charm and stubborness as a military student and officer. Women, from his mistress Mimi to his devoted cousin Marie and the prioress at Jerusalem played important roles in his life. He was first awakened to religious conviction on a surveying tour through Morocco, when disguised as a young Russian rabbi he felt the devoutness of both Jews and Moslems, and to this part of the world he was bound as a churchman. The story holds charm and drama for people of the faith, although the telling is somewhat stiff.

Pub Date: April 30th, 1953
Publisher: Little, Brown