THE LONG WAY DOWN by Robb White

THE LONG WAY DOWN

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KIRKUS REVIEW

A far cry from White's hard-bitten marine adventures, this is literally a bird's eye (and unintentionally a bird-brained) view of life under the Big Top as experienced by a fledgling trapeze artist or ""flyer."" In four short days, eighteen-year-old Tina O'Meara is taught to fly by young Danny (""the best in the business"") York. Within a few weeks she's the star attraction of the small traveling circus, and finally this airborne Pavlova begins dazzling the crowds by performing her act blindfolded. Convinced that she couldn't do any of it without Danny there to catch her, Tina won't accept the offer to headline with a big-time, threering outfit (read Barnum & Bailey) unless Danny (whom she loves but whom she's convinced views her only as an ""unidentified flying object"") comes with her. And big city operators being what they are in this type of simplistic set-up, everyone is sure her act is fake. . . until another flyer, attempting to expose her, trips Tina up and nearly kills her. Of course, Danny risks life and limb to catch the falling Tina in mid-air, and soon after the two profess their undying love and decide to head ""home."" The romance is as hard to swallow as Tina's meteoric rise to the (big) top, and the cloying sweetness of this circus story leaves you feeling like you've o.d.-ed on cotton candy.

Pub Date: Nov. 4th, 1977
Publisher: Doubleday