JUST AROUND THE CORNER by Robert Bendiner

JUST AROUND THE CORNER

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KIRKUS REVIEW

We haven't seen the 48 pages of cartoons and photographs of this ""selective history of the Thirties,"" but the text alone is a laudable diversion into nostalgia. Bendiner pretends to no thoroughness and some of the things he left out may be picked up in the pix. His view, through a glass backwards, and sometimes inwards, is generally oriented to politics and the economy, with sidelights on the Federal Arts Projects. He skimps on the WPA and seems indifferent to the States on the left half of the map. He was himself a reporter or editor on small-circulation political magazines, which is perhaps why he has so much to say about Roosevelt, Landon, Huey Long, the famous demagogues and the rise of the Bund, our political relations with Europe, and perhaps also why he has such high fun with the woes and fatuities of the rich. Bendiner's style is brisk, wry and always interesting. With the illustrations, this should be a perfectly enjoyable evening's reading, more whiskey and water than say the ruby port of Herbert Asbury.

Pub Date: April 26th, 1967
Publisher: Harper & Row