THE HARP IN THE SOUTH; POOR MAN'S ORANGE by Ruth Park

THE HARP IN THE SOUTH; POOR MAN'S ORANGE

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KIRKUS REVIEW

The last two volumes of an enormously popular, best-selling trilogy that went out of print some 35 years ago. The first book, Missus, was reissued last year; here, the Darcy family saga--set in the poor Irish immigrant community of 1900's Australia--moves forward, first to tell the story of older daughter Role, now 19, who, ""yearning for love,"" has a short-lived, disastrous affair with young Tommy Mendel (who leads her into a nightmare of a scene with some drunken sailors), then marries the ""dark-blooded,"" gentle, and caring Charlie. By the time of Poor Man's Orange, Role and Charlie have a young daughter, Motty and the story extends mainly to Roie's younger sister Dolour, here 16, who suffers through near-blindness and a terrible loneliness before the sad death of Role during childbirth. After her sister's death, Dolour becomes not only mother to Roie's children, but eventually a comfort and support to a despairing Charlie. Before the fadeout, there's romance--and a sense that the whole family, tested and strong, have reunited and will indeed survive. A superior series--warm, involving and agreeably unsentimental.

Pub Date: Oct. 2nd, 1987
Publisher: St. Martin's; St. Martin's