WIND IN THE SAHARA by R.V.C. Bodley
Kirkus Star

WIND IN THE SAHARA

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KIRKUS REVIEW

I loved this, though as a contribution to the current discussion of the Arab problem I don't suppose it is of vital importance. Bodley, inspired by Lawrence of Arabia and Gertrude Bell, undertook what his friends thought a mad scheme, -- to take up life anew after World War I, among the nomad Arabs of the Sahara. With no background of experience, but with a rather unusual inheritance, he set out; on his first glimpse of the Sahara from an oasis, he was victim of its strange fascination. This is the story of his subsequent years -- of the step by step adaptation to a new way of thought and life and being, of the nomads with whom he traveled and the oasis community where he had a second home. Of the philosophy which he learned to emulate. Of a people -- their religion, their characteristics, their way of life, their complete divorce from world affairs. Escape reading of a rather important kind.

Publisher: Coward, McCann