Science Fiction & Fantasy Book Reviews

EMPIRE OF NIGHT by Kelley Armstrong
SCIENCE FICTION & FANTASY
Released: April 7, 2015

"Cliffhangers and morbid humor balance out too many plot twists and slow pacing in this unnecessarily complicated sequel. Readers will have to wait for resolution. (Fantasy. 14 & up)"
Twins Moria and Ashyn may have left the Forest, but they aren't out of the woods yet in this romance- and politics-filled sequel to Sea of Shadows (2014).Read full book review >
SUPERPOSITION by David Walton
SCIENCE FICTION & FANTASY
Released: April 7, 2015

"A thrill a minute. Just don't ask questions."
The first volume of a near-future, science-fiction thriller duology, from the author of Quintessence (2013, etc.).Read full book review >

THE UNREMEMBERED by Peter Orullian
SCIENCE FICTION & FANTASY
Released: April 7, 2015

"In sum, a lumbering, gnarled behemoth that seeks to crush readers beneath its sheer mass."
Reboot (read: author's definitive edition) of a fantasy first published in 2011, pointing the way to an upcoming sequel. Read full book review >
WINDOW WALL by Melanie Rawn
SCIENCE FICTION & FANTASY
Released: April 14, 2015

"A decidedly improved outing, much more inventive and involving than the previous."
Another entry in Rawn's fantasy series (Thornlost, 2014, etc.) about a magical theater company in a sort-of Elizabethan, multispecies setting.Read full book review >
A CROWN FOR COLD SILVER by Alex Marshall
SCIENCE FICTION & FANTASY
Released: April 14, 2015

"A promising start."
What begins as a typical revenge story veers into an epic tale of invasion, civil war, and divine incursion in the apparent first of a series by a pseudonymous author. Read full book review >

MISPLACED by S.L. Hulen
SCIENCE FICTION & FANTASY
Released: April 15, 2015

"An imaginative tale sprinkled with a bit of magic and leaving enough unanswered questions to keep readers pondering the possible consequences long after the last page has been turned."
Hulen makes an impressive debut with this enjoyable time-travel fantasy. Read full book review >
THE MACHINE AWAKES by Adam Christopher
SCIENCE FICTION & FANTASY
Released: April 21, 2015

"Fans of the previous certainly will want to investigate."
Space opera set in the same universe as Christopher's space-horror yarn The Burning Dark (2014).Read full book review >
THE ARCHITECT OF AEONS by John C. Wright
SCIENCE FICTION & FANTASY
Released: April 21, 2015

"Impressive, with dull intervals, but for the committed only."
Fourth of a projected six-volume series (The Judge of Ages, 2014, etc.) charting the future history of an Earth threatened by almost inconceivably advanced alien invaders. Read full book review >
POSITIVE by David Wellington
SCIENCE FICTION & FANTASY
Released: April 21, 2015

"Lacking the storytelling virtuosity of World War Z or the emotional impact of The Passage, the novel suffers from a woefully underdeveloped and naïve hero, a love story without an ounce of heat, and a carload of ancient zombie tropes just begging to be put out of their misery."
A young survivor of the zombie pandemic finds himself thrust outside the comfort and safety of post-apocalyptic Manhattan and into the wastelands of America in this coming-of-age novel from Wellington (The Hydra Protocol, 2014, etc.)Read full book review >
PIRATE'S ALLEY by Suzanne Johnson
SCIENCE FICTION & FANTASY
Released: April 21, 2015

"Still, the world and characters are appealing, and fans of the series will find enough of its charms here to keep them reading."
An urban fantasy set in a mysteriously snow-covered New Orleans. Read full book review >
THE AFFINITIES by Robert Charles Wilson
SCIENCE FICTION & FANTASY
Released: April 21, 2015

"An intriguing and seriously innovative attempt to grapple with some of the issues raised by the 21st century's obsession with social media."
Social science fiction from the author of Burning Paradise (2013, etc.).Read full book review >
THE GIRL AT MIDNIGHT by Melissa Grey
SCIENCE FICTION & FANTASY
Released: April 28, 2015

"The well-built world, vivid characters, and perfect blend of action and amour should have readers eagerly seeking the sequel. (Fantasy. 14 & up)"
Seventeen-year-old Echo is an odd bird, but she soars in this urban fantasy. Read full book review >
Kirkus Interview
Frank Bruni
March 31, 2015

Over the last few decades, Americans have turned college admissions into a terrifying and occasionally devastating process, preceded by test prep, tutors, all sorts of stratagems, all kinds of rankings, and a conviction among too many young people that their futures will be determined and their worth established by which schools say yes and which say no. In Where You Go Is Not Who You’ll Be, New York Times columnist Frank Bruni explains why, giving students and their parents a new perspective on this brutal, deeply flawed competition and a path out of the anxiety that it provokes. “Written in a lively style but carrying a wallop, this is a book that family and educators cannot afford to overlook as they try to navigate the treacherous waters of college admissions,” our reviewer writes. View video >