THE BRITISH COMMONWEALTH by Sir Edward Grigg

THE BRITISH COMMONWEALTH

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KIRKUS REVIEW

Not a book for the uninitiate in government and international affairs, but -- for those who have sufficient background to balance his viewpoint with mature judgment, this is a considered, tempered examination of the imperial mission and the problems inherent in building up an Empire system of collective security. The author is a conservative, an imperialist in the better sense. His brief for the system is that Great Britain by herself cannot maintain parity in the company of the U.S.A., the U.S.S.R. and China, and that nothing less than the whole British Empire can speak on equal terms. He answers American criticism of Imperialism, defends Britain's relations with her peoples, feels that India must reach some agreement within before she is ready for self government. He feels that federalism is impracticable, that the present between dominions and colonies, forming two empires instead of one, is unfortunate. His solution is a regional commonwealth, with the Crown as symbol of unity, the Imperial conference as central constitutional organ, and he outlines such a regional organization, with its institutions and machinery to effect a close, justly represented and justly administered unit. He sees this as a necessary step before the imposition of any kind of supra-national authority. A controversial book -- for those informed on the subject.

Pub Date: March 2nd, 1944
Publisher: Liveright