An encouraging playbook for would-be demon-slayers.

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Master Your Inner World

EMBRACE YOUR POWER WITH JOY

From the Demon Slayer's Handbook series , Vol. 1

A handbook for personal empowerment that concentrates on life’s demons and how to fight them.

The latest in Dunblazier’s (The Demon Slayer’s Handbook, 2015) series continues to offer personal anecdotes about her struggles as a psychic and spiritualist, as well as an account of the demons that she believes inhabit the mortal world. “There is a connection between people and demons,” she assures readers, and she structures her latest handbook around five parables (“the stories of the spirit guides that have worked with me in this lifetime and for some over many lifetimes”) and five “basic levels of perception”: physical, etheric, emotional, mental, and causal. Dunblazier focuses on encouraging her readers to remain vigilant in the face of the world’s evils, and to marshal the resources that are at their disposal, which include calm introspection, self-possession, and even good humor: “One of the things I know is that when you’re facing the devil head-on, or running for your life, fear is your friend—but not completely,” she writes in one of the book’s many pleasing, counterintuitive moves. “Your fear will eventually turn on you.” The author returns periodically to her own history with her spirit guides, but the main thrust of her book is a set of upbeat propositions about living in the moment and mastering one’s unruly inner world. These are aimed squarely at fellow spiritualists but are also applicable to a wider audience that’s prepared to see demons as metaphors. “Demons are energy, and energy doesn’t go away,” she warns readers, “it changes form”—hence, her emphasis on being alert and ready for anything. Using a potent combination of mystical concepts, including chakras and past lives, Dunblazier creates a guidebook that assures readers that they have the tools to defeat their own demons. The overall ideological framework can feel jumbled at times, but the central message of empowerment will appeal to spiritual seekers.

An encouraging playbook for would-be demon-slayers.

Pub Date: May 6, 2016

ISBN: 978-0-9963907-4-3

Page Count: -

Publisher: GoTracee Publishing

Review Posted Online: Nov. 17, 2016

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Stricter than, say, Bergen Evans or W3 ("disinterested" means impartial — period), Strunk is in the last analysis...

THE ELEMENTS OF STYLE

50TH ANNIVERSARY EDITION

Privately published by Strunk of Cornell in 1918 and revised by his student E. B. White in 1959, that "little book" is back again with more White updatings.

Stricter than, say, Bergen Evans or W3 ("disinterested" means impartial — period), Strunk is in the last analysis (whoops — "A bankrupt expression") a unique guide (which means "without like or equal").

Pub Date: May 15, 1972

ISBN: 0205632645

Page Count: 105

Publisher: Macmillan

Review Posted Online: Oct. 28, 2011

Kirkus Reviews Issue: May 1, 1972

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Analyzing his craft, a careful craftsman urges with Thoreauvian conviction that writers should simplify, simplify, simplify.

SEVERAL SHORT SENTENCES ABOUT WRITING

New York Times columnist and editorial board member delivers a slim book for aspiring writers, offering saws and sense, wisdom and waggery, biases and biting sarcasm.

Klinkenborg (Timothy; or, Notes of an Abject Reptile, 2006), who’s taught for decades, endeavors to keep things simple in his prose, and he urges other writers to do the same. (Note: He despises abuses of the word as, as he continually reminds readers.) In the early sections, the author ignores traditional paragraphing so that the text resembles a long free-verse poem. He urges readers to use short, clear sentences and to make sure each one is healthy before moving on; notes that it’s acceptable to start sentences with and and but; sees benefits in diagramming sentences; stresses that all writing is revision; periodically blasts the formulaic writing that many (most?) students learn in school; argues that knowing where you’re headed before you begin might be good for a vacation, but not for a piece of writing; and believes that writers must trust readers more, and trust themselves. Most of Klinkenborg’s advice is neither radical nor especially profound (“Turn to the poets. / Learn from them”), and the text suffers from a corrosive fallacy: that if his strategies work for him they will work for all. The final fifth of the text includes some passages from writers he admires (McPhee, Oates, Cheever) and some of his students’ awkward sentences, which he treats analytically but sometimes with a surprising sarcasm that veers near meanness. He includes examples of students’ dangling modifiers, malapropisms, errors of pronoun agreement, wordiness and other mistakes.

Analyzing his craft, a careful craftsman urges with Thoreauvian conviction that writers should simplify, simplify, simplify.

Pub Date: Aug. 7, 2012

ISBN: 978-0-307-26634-7

Page Count: 224

Publisher: Knopf

Review Posted Online: May 14, 2012

Kirkus Reviews Issue: June 15, 2012

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