BREATHE THE AIR AGAIN by Ward Moore

BREATHE THE AIR AGAIN

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KIRKUS REVIEW

Yes, indeed, and make it good fresh air, for here is one of these oversized sagas of the early days of the labor movement, in meticulous detail, most of it unpleasant. A derivative of Halper and Maitz, without their punch; hampered by undisciplined wordage, literary mannerisms, unnecessary devotion to distasteful sexual ornamentation. The story of Simon Epstein, who quits his job in a Los Angeles department store, takes odd jobs in Oakland, in Salt Lake City, in Chicago; who drifts from foundry, to restaurant, to farm. Each locale provides its amatory experience; in Chicago he becomes involved in the radical movement; he returns to his department store berth in Los Angeles, and helps to unionize the store. The book closes with a strike, which ends in violence -- and failure. A book with a theme greater than its handling, which alienates where it intends to affect.

Pub Date: Feb. 1st, 1942
Publisher: Harper