STREET CORNER CONSERVATIVE by William F. Gavin

STREET CORNER CONSERVATIVE

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KIRKUS REVIEW

This is a very confused book. Gavin, a special assistant to Sen. James Buckley, tries to characterize a particular brand of conservatism--sort of but not exactly blue-collar ethnic, sort of but not exactly Irish-Catholic, sort of but not exactly urban because it's carried on in the children of those who have abandoned the inner city neighborhood for the suburbs, white-collar lifestyles and public schools. Neighborhood is a crucial, even a mystical concept to Gavin, who spends at least a third of his book describing the glories of growing up in Jersey City, circa 1942. His life there seems to have revolved largely around ""hanging-out"" Jimmy Cagney-tough on street corners and watching Westerns and horror movies at the Tivoli theater. This rich existence plus the good nuns in All Saints' grammar school gave him ""the abundance of moral strength, patriotism and love of family"" that is the core of any true conservative. The true conservative is sick and tired of having Liberals, who have been running the country for too many years, writing books about him. The street corner conservative resents being discovered by the media--although it's about time someone listened to him. What do urban conservatives want? ""They want to be left alone. . . the urban conservatives don't want anything except to be left alone, to live out their lives."" Well okay, Mr. Gavin.

Pub Date: Aug. 1st, 1975
Publisher: Arlington House