Series: Toys Go Out


CHILDREN'S
Released: Sept. 13, 2011

"This enjoyable trio deserves its rightful place away from the confines of any toy chest. (Fantasy. 6-9)"
Who could imagine the introduction of a self-conscious stingray could lead to such great things? Read full book review >
ADVENTURE
Released: Sept. 9, 2008

Even more tender than its predecessor, these six related stories skillfully capture the bittersweet challenges of childhood independence. Initially featured in Jenkins and Zelinsky's Toys Go Out (2006), this collection stars winsome stuffed buffalo Lumpy, endearing rubber ball Plastic and vulnerable dry-clean-only StingRay. Witty dialogue and humorous scenes enhance these well-developed characters, as the friends realize their cherished girl's growing fondness for Barbies and sleepovers takes precedence over her once-favored toys. Stories center on the new chewing-obsessed toy shark, Spark, who receives quite the unusual welcome, the perilous health of Dryer, unexpected basement parties and the toys' unfortunate experimentation with nail polish. Zelinsky's superlative black-and-white drawings never fail to bring warmth and depth to these chapters. The girl, not completely grown, occasionally still finds comfort with her toys; StingRay wisely notes that she will love them "forever but not as much." Fortunately, StingRay's statement rings false when describing this winning work, whose original fans should enjoy this entry as much as the first. Poignant and compelling, this sequel sparkles. (Fantasy. 5-9)Read full book review >
ADVENTURE
Released: Sept. 12, 2006

A little girl has three toys who are best friends: Stingray, a stuffed stingray who claims to know it all, Lumphy; a daring and curious stuffed buffalo; and Plastic, a bouncing, red toy who has yet to find out her true identity. The three toys love the little girl, and life in her bedroom is fine and—usually— predictable, but when the toys go out into the wide world outside, almost anything can happen. Six stories, accompanied by Zelinsky's lively black-and-white illustrations, tell of their escapades and discoveries, including an eventful trip to the beach, the development of an intimate knowledge of the washing machine, the pitfalls of sleeping atop the bed and an understanding of the importance of birthdays. A blend of Toy Story and the stories of Johnny Gruelle and A.A. Milne, this is a solid collection that will serve as a good read-aloud, as well as a nice choice for young readers, who will enjoy exploring the warm, secret world of toys. (Fiction. 6-10)Read full book review >