Books by Adam Rapp

Adam Rapp (Stone Cold Dead Serious) has been the recipient of the Herbert & Patricia Brodkin Scholarship, two Lincoln Center le Compte du Nouy Awards, a fellowship to the Camargo Foundation in Cassis, France, the1999 Princess Grace Award for Playwrighting


FUM by Adam Rapp
YOUNG ADULT
Released: March 20, 2018

"A meandering, dehumanizing tale characterized by a tenacious abhorrence of the body. (Fiction. 14-adult)"
A teen has prophetic visions. Read full book review >
DECELERATE BLUE by Adam Rapp
GRAPHIC NOVELS & COMIC BOOKS
Released: Feb. 14, 2017

"This is a strikingly illustrated book set in a potentially massive world, and readers will hope this isn't the only story to come from it. (Graphic science fiction. 14 & up)"
The U.S.A. is governed by forces dedicated to accelerated living, monitoring everyone with implants and countless cameras and harshly punishing sedition. Read full book review >
KNOW YOUR BEHOLDER by Adam Rapp
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: March 3, 2015

"An intimate, frustrating account of a man failing to deal with his failure."
Rapp (The Year of Endless Sorrows, 2006, etc.) brings dark humor and honesty to a story of death, divorce and disappearance.Read full book review >
Released: Feb. 1, 2012

"Hard to read, impossible to forget. (Fiction. 14 & up)"
Two wayward teens fall under the evil thrall of a third in this disturbing tale by the Printz Honor-winning author of Punkzilla (2009). Read full book review >
PUNKZILLA by Adam Rapp
ADVENTURE
Released: May 1, 2009

"But his cast of disenfranchised characters is so authentically rendered (dim Bucktooth Jenny talks to her collection of doll heads, kindly transsexual Lewis cooks Jamie a hotplate meal) that fans of his gritty YA fare will be more than happy to be in his company again. (Fiction. 14 & up)"
Rapp mines his Midwestern roots for another well-realized tale of raw teenage woe. Read full book review >
THE YEAR OF ENDLESS SORROWS by Adam Rapp
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: Jan. 1, 2007

"A familiar story originally rendered."
The first novel for adults from an award-winning playwright and young-adult author (Under the Wolf, Under the Dog, 2004). Read full book review >
UNDER THE WOLF, UNDER THE DOG by Adam Rapp
FAMILY AND GROWING UP
Released: Oct. 1, 2004

"A certain grim humor sometimes relieves the heavy narrative, which does end with a gleam of hope for readers who have stuck with the long, disturbing story. (Fiction. YA)"
Like so many teen protagonists, Steve Nugent is struggling with his mother's death from cancer. Read full book review >
33 SNOWFISH by Adam Rapp
FICTION
Released: March 1, 2003

"The snug warmth of Seldom's home and the little family he and Custis and the baby have formed contrasts powerfully with the frigid internal winter that Custis has survived, allowing both Custis and the reader to hope for redemption. (Fiction. YA)"
The bleak scenery of winter forms the backdrop to this tale of three runaways, bonded together to grasp feebly for emotional warmth. Read full book review >
LITTLE CHICAGO by Adam Rapp
FICTION
Released: April 15, 2002

"Blacky's quixotic innocence survives it all, but Rapp has so stacked the odds against him that readers will wonder whether that's going to be enough to carry him through. (Fiction. YA)"
Rapp's (The Copper Elephant, 1999, etc.) bleakest tragicomedy yet piles physical abuse, sexual abuse, and vicious peer harassment onto and into the head of a broken 11-year-old. Read full book review >
THE COPPER ELEPHANT by Adam Rapp
Released: Nov. 30, 1999

"Often gripping, sometimes blackly funny in a squalid way, this will remind readers of Russell Hoban's Ridley Walker (1980) and other tales of post-apocalyptic devastation. (Fiction. 13-15)"
Envisioning a nightmarish future in which children deemed small or otherwise defective are worked to death breaking rocks, and the constant rain is so acid it raises blisters, Rapp (Buffalo Tree, 1997) crafts another lurid shocker. Read full book review >
THE BUFFALO TREE by Adam Rapp
FICTION
Released: May 30, 1997

"Rapp (Missing the Piano, 1994) writes in earthy but adept language in this dark and stirring novel. (Fiction. 12+)"
In a distinctive, compelling narrative, Sura, 12, chronicles life at a juvenile detention home, where he has been sent for stealing hood ornaments. Read full book review >