Books by Alan Baker

NON-FICTION
Released: Feb. 14, 2003

"A blessing for any fancier of knights, from the smitten 12-year-old to the older guy who can't believe his bad luck at having been born 900 years too late."
A brisk, fact-filled introduction to the elements of knighthood and its evolution in the 11th through 15th centuries. Read full book review >
RED DOG by Louis de Bernières
Released: Sept. 11, 2001

"The thousands of readers who loved Corelli's Mandolin have waited impatiently for its author's next novel, so one understands why this innocuous little non-book was published. But why was it written?"
De Bernières's first book since his immensely popular fourth novel, Corelli's Mandolin (1994), is a slender collection of 15 brief interrelated tales about a legendary mutt (1971-79) who became the beloved honorary "mate" of laborers in the salt- and iron-works of northwestern coastal Australia. Read full book review >
NON-FICTION
Released: Sept. 1, 2001

"An entrancing popular study of a topic so outlandish and atrocious from today's perspective that it can't help but fascinate."
A US debut from British historian Baker renders a real taste of the unenviable gladiatorial life. Read full book review >
WHERE'S MOUSE? by Alan Baker
ANIMALS
Released: Dec. 1, 1992

"A visually pleasing book that will appeal to very young children who enjoy simple books about animals. (Picture book. 2-5)"
An accordion-fold book with peek-through pages mimicking holes (e.g., in a hollow tree) through which animal characters can be seen in a three-dimensional effect. Read full book review >
BOTH SIDES NOW by Joni Mitchell
CHILDREN'S
Released: Oct. 1, 1992

A favorite popular song (``I've looked at clouds...From up and down, and still somehow... Read full book review >
TWO TINY MICE by Alan Baker
ANIMALS
Released: May 1, 1991

"The expansive, delicately detailed illustrations are the focus here; they are a pleasure—and a quiet reminder that this world is worth preserving. (Picture book. 2-7)"
The mice may be tiny, but they're displayed to fine advantage—and often larger than life—in this big, handsome book whose text simply enumerates the other creatures the mice see in the lovely British countryside, then tucks them in their nest for the night. Read full book review >